What to do for the Introduction and Thesis

Introduction and Thesis

 

Value: 10%

 

Peer review date: TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, by 11:55 PM (23:55) PDT, with a 12-HOUR GRACE PERIOD

 

Final Submission date: FRIDAY, AUGUST 7 by 11:55 PM (23:55) PDT, with a 24-hour grace period.

 

Word Count: Approximately 300 words with a brief outline of your major arguments

 

Here is where you get the chance to start writing a key part of your paper. No matter what type of academic writing you are performing, an introduction is crucial, and you will often be called upon to draft a preliminary thesis.

 

 

What to do for the Introduction and Thesis

For most of you, your introduction will be one paragraph that includes your thesis statement. We’ll go over in some detail possible structures for introduction paragraphs, but, generally, they include an introductory sentence that sums up your topic; a roadmap or outline of what you’ll be doing in your paper (your proposal will probably form the basis of this roadmap), and your thesis. Ideally, your introduction also catches your intended audience’s attention and suggests why your topic is worthy of discussion. Please note that you will need to keep revising your introduction and thesis up until submission – they are difficult to write and tend to change shape as the project evolves.

 

A thesis clearly states your position on your topic. Where a topic is general and includes lots of different perspectives (for example, if you chose “decorating cookies” as your topic), a thesis makes an argument or claim about that topic (for example, “Buttercream icing should be used for soft cookies, while royal icing should be used for hard cookies”). A strong thesis is debatable; in other words, a thesis needs to make a claim that someone could reasonably disagree with. (For example, I couldn’t really disagree with cookie decorations as a topic, but I could disagree with your thesis and say that buttercream is best for hard cookies.) We will spend lots of time discussing thesis statements and revising your thesis statements. For now, your thesis will help to guide decisions not only about how to persuade your intended audience but also how to address those who disagree with your position. (Of course, evidence will also be crucial in this regard.)

 

What to do for the Outline

Your outline for the entire paper may be drafted before or after you write your introduction and thesis. In whatever order you create the outline, you need to follow these steps:

 

1. You need to determine the purpose of your paper and the audience.

2. Then you need to figure out your preliminary (draft) thesis. (You will do so in Practice Assignment 4 in Week Five so this shouldn’t be a problem.)

3. Finally, you need to figure out how you will organize your outline. In order to do so, please visit the Owl Purdue “Type of Outlines” site so you can determine an appropriate structure.

 

Your outline must include the following elements:

· 2 or 3 major arguments that relate to your thesis;

· An overview of the evidence you will use to support your arguments.

You can also include any other elements (such as explanations, quotations) that you might help you to organize your thoughts and, therefore, make writing your Research Paper (and any major project or paper in any other class) easier.

 

 

Assignment Completion Checklist

*Note: these are the things I’m looking for when I grade your assignments

· Your name is on the assignment and in the document title when you save it

 

Introduction Paragraph

· Written in formal academic prose. (Grammar and writing style count here.)

· Includes an introductory statement, a roadmap (that shows the development of your argument), and a thesis statement

· Is approximately 200-300 words

 

Thesis Statement

· One or more sentences that clearly state your position on your topic. (Your thesis will likely be the final sentence or two of your introduction paragraph.)

· The position presented by your thesis one that a reasonable reader could potentially disagree with.

· The thesis can be supported by evidence.

 

Outline

· You include an outline of your paper in an easy to follow format.

· That outline includes 2 or 3 major argumentative points that relate to your thesis.

· The outline also summarizes and/or describes available evidence that supports these argumentative points.

 

 

The Marking Rubric for all AWR assignments can be found here: https://www.uvic.ca/humanities/english/undergraduate/resources/firstyeargrading/index.php .

 

This is an explanation of how I am grading this assignment more specifically:

 

The A- range paper:

Content: An A-range Introduction and Thesis features a relevant and engaging introductory statement that catches the reader’s attention both in terms of its clarity and its ability to capture the overall topic of the paper; a roadmap that clearly indicates the main points to be covered and how the argument will develop over the course of the paper; and a thesis statement (which can be one or more sentences as needed). The thesis statement offers a clear, concise, debatable, and supportable position on the topic. The outline clearly maps the paper’s trajectory. The assignment’s strengths greatly outweigh its weaknesses.

 

Writing: The assignment is written in clear academic prose that is coherent and pleasurable to read. The writing does not impede reading but facilitates reading.

 

The B-range paper:

Content: A B-range Introduction and Thesis has a relevant introductory statement that both catches the reader’s attention and summarizes the topic; a roadmap that indicates the main points to be covered and how the argument will develop over the course of the paper, and a thesis statement. The thesis statement offers a concise, conceivably debatable, and reasonably supportable position on the topic. The outline maps the paper’s trajectory. Strengths clearly outweigh weaknesses, but there are notable opportunities for improvement.

 

Writing: The assignment is written in clear academic prose that contains few grammatical errors.

 

 

The C-range paper:

Content: A C-range Introduction and Thesis has an introductory statement that attempts to catch the reader’s attention and summarize the topic; a roadmap that indicates the main points to be covered and how the argument will develop over the course of the paper; and a functional thesis statement; the thesis statement offers a conceivably debatable position on the topic. The outline maps the paper’s trajectory but seems to be missing elements. Both strengths and weaknesses are evident, but strengths still outweigh weaknesses. There are many ways in which this assignment could be improved.

 

Writing: The assignment is written in academic prose, but may contain grammatical errors. The writing may, at times, be difficult to understand.

 

The D-range paper:

Content: A D-range Introduction and Thesis starts with information relevant to the topic, but may not include a clear introductory statement or a logical road map; it does contain a thesis statement, but that thesis statement may be unclear or difficult to locate within the paragraph. The thesis statement offers a position on the topic, but it might be inappropriately obvious or too convoluted to understand. The position might be impossible to support. The assignment may go off topic. The outline is difficult to follow. Strengths and weaknesses are approximately even. Needed improvements are numerous and obvious.

 

Writing: The assignment is written in full sentences but contains grammatical errors that impact readability. The writing is sometimes difficult to understand. This assignment might rely too heavily on slang or unnecessary jargon (discipline-specific language that is usually unfamiliar to people outside of the discipline) for it to be understandable, or it might use overly formal language that impedes readability.

 

* If your assignment receives a D, please come and talk to me during Office Hours, or set up an appointment, so that we can create a plan for your next assignment or discuss the possibility of you rewriting and resubmitting this assignment.

 

The F-range paper:

Content: An F-range Introduction and Thesis may not be written in paragraph form, or it might contain information inappropriate for an introduction paragraph. The thesis statement, if it’s there at all, is overly obvious or too convoluted to understand. It might merely describe a topic, make a statement with which no one could disagree, or lay out an unsupportable claim. The assignment often goes off topic and includes material unrelated to the topic. The outline may be missing or be missing major elements. Likely, the assignment guidelines were not followed. Weaknesses outweigh strengths.

 

Writing: The assignment is difficult to understand and contains grammatical errors are an obstacle to readability.

 

* If your assignment receives an F, please come and talk to me during Office Hours, or set up an appointment, so that we can create a plan for your next assignment or discuss the possibility of you rewriting and resubmitting this assignment..

 

Introduction and Thesis

 

 

Value:

 

10%

 

 

Peer review date

:

 

TUESDAY

, AUGUST

4

,

by 11:55 PM (23:55) PDT

,

with

a

12

HOUR

 

GRACE PERIOD

 

 

Final Submission date:

 

F

RIDAY

,

AUGUST

 

7

 

by

 

11:55 PM (23:55) PDT, with a 24

hour grace

period.

 

 

Word Count:

 

Approximately 300 words

 

with a brief outline of your major arguments

 

 

Here is where you get the chance to start writing a

key

part of your paper

.

No matter what type

of academic writing you are performing, an introduction is crucial

,

 

and

 

you will

 

often

 

be called

upon to draft

 

a

preliminary

thesis.

 

 

 

What to do for the Introd

uction and Thesis

 

For most of you, your introduction will be one paragraph that includes your thesis statement.

We’ll go over

in some detail

possible structures for introduction paragraphs, but,

 

generally, they

include an introductory sentence that sum

s up

 

your topic;

 

a roadmap or outline of what you’ll be

doing i

n your paper (your proposal

 

will probably form the basis of this roadmap

)

, and your

thesis.

 

Ideally, your introduction also catches your intended audience’s attention and suggests

why your topic is worthy of discussion.

Please note that you will need to

keep revising your

introduction and thesis up until submission

 

they are difficult to write a

nd tend to change shape

as the project evolves.

 

 

A the

sis c

learly states your position on

your topic. Where a topic is general and i

ncludes lots of

different perspectives (for example,

if

 

you

 

chose “decorating cookies” as your topic), a thesis

makes an arg

ument or claim about that topic (for example, “

B

uttercream icing should be used for

soft cookies, while royal icing should be used for hard cookies”). A strong thesis is debatable; in

other words, a thesis

needs to make

 

a claim that someone could

reasonabl

y

disagree with

.

 

(

F

or

example, I couldn’t really disagree with cookie decorations as a topic, but I could disagree with

your thesis and say that buttercream is best for hard cookies

.

) We will spend lots of time

discussing thesis statements and revising you

r thesis statements.

For now, your thesis will help to

guide decisions

not only

about how to

persuade your intended audience but also

how to

address

those who disagree with your position.

(

Of course, evi

dence

will also be

crucial in this regard

.

)

 

 

What to

do for the

O

utline

 

Your outline for the entire paper may be drafted

before

 

or after

 

you write your introduction and

thesis

.

 

In

 

whatever order you create the outline, you need to follow these steps:

 

 

1.

 

You need to determine the purpose of your paper and the audience

.

 

2.

 

Then you need to figure out your preliminary (draft) thesis

.

 

(

Y

ou will do so in Practice

Assignment 4 in Week Five so

 

this shouldn’t be a problem

.

)

 

Introduction and Thesis

 

Value: 10%

 

Peer review date: TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, by 11:55 PM (23:55) PDT, with a 12-HOUR

GRACE PERIOD

 

Final Submission date: FRIDAY, AUGUST 7 by 11:55 PM (23:55) PDT, with a 24-hour grace

period.

 

Word Count: Approximately 300 words with a brief outline of your major arguments

 

Here is where you get the chance to start writing a key part of your paper. No matter what type

of academic writing you are performing, an introduction is crucial, and you will often be called

upon to draft a preliminary thesis.

 

 

What to do for the Introduction and Thesis

For most of you, your introduction will be one paragraph that includes your thesis statement.

We’ll go over in some detail possible structures for introduction paragraphs, but, generally, they

include an introductory sentence that sums up your topic; a roadmap or outline of what you’ll be

doing in your paper (your proposal will probably form the basis of this roadmap), and your

thesis. Ideally, your introduction also catches your intended audience’s attention and suggests

why your topic is worthy of discussion. Please note that you will need to keep revising your

introduction and thesis up until submission – they are difficult to write and tend to change shape

as the project evolves.

 

A thesis clearly states your position on your topic. Where a topic is general and includes lots of

different perspectives (for example, if you chose “decorating cookies” as your topic), a thesis

makes an argument or claim about that topic (for example, “Buttercream icing should be used for

soft cookies, while royal icing should be used for hard cookies”). A strong thesis is debatable; in

other words, a thesis needs to make a claim that someone could reasonably disagree with. (For

example, I couldn’t really disagree with cookie decorations as a topic, but I could disagree with

your thesis and say that buttercream is best for hard cookies.) We will spend lots of time

discussing thesis statements and revising your thesis statements. For now, your thesis will help to

guide decisions not only about how to persuade your intended audience but also how to address

those who disagree with your position. (Of course, evidence will also be crucial in this regard.)

 

What to do for the Outline

Your outline for the entire paper may be drafted before or after you write your introduction and

thesis. In whatever order you create the outline, you need to follow these steps:

 

1. You need to determine the purpose of your paper and the audience.

2. Then you need to figure out your preliminary (draft) thesis. (You will do so in Practice

Assignment 4 in Week Five so this shouldn’t be a problem.)

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